The PF City Power Plant
written by: AngelxOxBabiie and InvalidEntry

Each of the Power Federation cities has their own Power Plant. The PF City Power Plant allows its citizens to build on their empty plots of property. The Power Plant is easily accessible by first going to the PF City Hall (under the Federation menu) and then selecting the Power Plant. The Power Plant stores both energy and resources for the citizens.

Industrial buildings can generate energy and resources to deliver to the city’s Power Plant. Each of the four different industrial buildings take a different amount of time and generate a different amount of energy/resources. A reference table is shown below for one-deed properties; larger properties will generate a proportional amount of energy/resources (but time will remain the same). For example, a two-deed wind power generator will produce twice the amount of energy (2×10=20 units of energy) but will still take only 360 minutes.

indusctiral 1

*The resource converter costs five resource units in order to convert to forty energy units.

Commercial buildings use energy that your city has already stored in its Power Plant.  The two commercial buildings are Restaurants and Play Zones.  For each food or toy that you stock in those buildings, you will be charged for using one unit of energy.

Residential buildings also use energy that your city has already stored in its Power Plant.  Inside residential buildings you can add different rooms such as a kitchen, workshop, or hydroponics room.  For each item that you cook, build, or grow inside your residential house you will be charged for using one unit of energy.

 

In August 2013 it was announced that the PF Construction Stores would be bound by city (meaning one can only purchase the items available in the construction store of the PF city that you live in).  Each city’s mayor would be responsible for ordering items for their city’s construction store.  The mayor has a list of items available to order at the bottom of their city’s Power Plant.  Clicking on an item will bring up a pop-up box that includes information about ordering that item.  Each item costs a specific amount of energy, resources, and citybucks.  It also takes a certain number of minutes to make the item before it can be randomly stocked in the store.  These values are predetermined by the site and cannot be changed.

 

Mayors are now also in charge of how much (in kangabucks) an item stocks for in the construction store.  Powerpets will provide a suggested price, but the price can be adjusted by the mayor.  It is up to the mayor to set a fair price.  If an item is priced too low the city will lose money and if it’s priced too high the item may not be purchased and will take up space.  The construction store can hold a maximum of 60 items; this includes items currently for sale and items on order.  For every one kangabuck charged, the city will receive 200 CB upon time of sale.

 

For your convenience, the information provided to the mayors for the air compressor is shown below.  Remember that the suggested price can be adjusted; the other information is given by the site and cannot be changed.  If this air compressor was sold at 40 kangabucks, the city will receive 40×200=8000 CB upon time of sale.

indusctiral 2

There are a few factors that mayors must consider in determining a fair price.  Citybucks is not the only factor to determine how much it costs the city to order an item; energy and resources must also be considered.  Why?  Citizens with industrial buildings who are generating energy and resources to deliver to the city are paid in powerbucks.  Those powerbucks come from the city’s treasury.  Each unit of energy and resources used in ordering an item for the construction store was already paid for by the city.  Ignoring this cost will only result in the city losing money.

 

The cost of a unit of energy or resources is determined by each city.  The mayor has the ability to control this price in the Power Plant.  It is important to note that city-related prices are set in citybucks and that 1 CB = 10 PB.

 

The “plant unit purchase” price will determine how much the city will pay those citizens with industrial buildings for one unit of energy or resources.  For example, if a city set their “plant unit purchase” price at 20 CB, the citizen will get paid 200 PB for delivering one unit of energy or resources.  The “plant unit sell” price will determine how much the city will charge those citizens with commercial buildings for one unit of energy.  For example, if a city set their “plant unit sell” price at 25 CB, the citizen will be charged 250 PB for using one unit of energy.

 

With this knowledge we can now accurately determine how much it is costing the city to order items for the construction store.  As shown above, an air compressor requires 335 units of energy, 25 units of resources, and 1600 citybucks.  Let’s assume the city’s “plant unit purchase” price is set at 20 CB.  This means for each unit of energy and resources, the city paid out 20 CB.  Therefore, the total cost of ordering this item will be (20×335) + (20×25) + 1600 = 8800 CB.  The suggested price for an air compressor is 40 kangabucks.  Remember that for every one kangabuck charged, the city will receive 200 CB upon time of sale.  If we sold this item for 40 kangabucks, the city will receive 40×200=8000 CB.  However, the cost for ordering this item was 8800 CB and we only made back 8000 CB.  This means that we lost 800 CB on the sale which is no good!

 

Losing money on each item ordered will quickly lead to a city in trouble.  We have two options to fix this.  As previously mentioned, the suggested price can be adjusted by the mayor.  The mayor can choose to charge a higher price.  Let’s assume the mayor decided to charge 45 KBs for this air compressor.  The city will receive 45×200=9000 CB upon time of sale.  The cost of ordering the item was 8800 CB, so now we are left with a small profit of 200 CB.

The other option is to lower the “plant unit purchase” price in the Power Plant.  Lowering this price means that the city will pay out less money per unit of energy or resources, therefore bringing the overall cost of the item down.  This also means that the citizens with industrial buildings will be making less profit, so it is up to the mayor to find a fair balance.

 

For your convenience, we are including a spreadsheet that shows the effects on the cost of ordering an item by changing the “plant unit purchase” price.  The first six columns (colored pink) consist of information provided by the site.  The purple columns show the effects of changing the “plant purchase unit” price to 15 CB.  The Total CB Cost is calculated in the same manner as discussed above.  The “Min KB Cost to Profit” shows the minimum price the mayor can set for those items and break even on the sale (anything higher will be profit; anything lower will be a loss).  The orange and green columns are set up similarly; however, the orange columns represent the effects of the “plant purchase unit” price at 20 CB and the green at 25 CB.  The purpose of this spreadsheet is to compare the Suggested KB Price to the three Minimum KB Costs to Profit.  As you can see, cities with their “plant purchase unit” price set at 20 CB or higher will have to raise their suggested price to break even on the sale (or profit if higher).

Go to your cities Power Plant to see what your city has their Plant Purchase Unit set for.

 

 

(Visited 181 times, 1 visits today)