• A cat has sweat glands on their paws and tongue.

• Cats have over one hundred vocal sounds, but dogs only have about ten.
• Cat milk is 10% protein where cow milk is only 3%.
• Cats have 32 muscles in each ear and they purr at about 26 cycles per second.
• In ancient Egypt, killing a cat was a crime punishable by death.
• Spooky, a blue Russian cat, and “George,” a Boston Terrier, were the first animals in America to be fitted with prescription contact lenses!
• The sphynx, a breed of domestic cat, first appeared in Canada in 1966. Although called hairless, the cats actually are covered with very short hair that is difficult to see and even more difficult to feel.
• The Maine Coon has been the official cat of the state of Maine since 1985.
• The cheetah is one of only four known species of cats with semi-retractable claws (the other three species are the Fishing Cat, the Flat-headed Cat and the Iriomote Cat).
• The cheetah races across the grassy plains of Africa at 100 km/hr, maybe more, arching and stretching its body to run faster. It is the fastest runner in the world, but it can only stay at top speed for a few hundred metres.
• The Asiatic cheetah (A. j. venaticus), a subspecies of cheetah once found throughout Asia, is now critically endangered. Today, only 50-100 Asiatic cheetahs are believed to exist, with all confirmed reports of sightings coming from Iran.
• The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), is the only living member of the genus Acinonyx.
• When a cheetah runs, only one paw at a time touches the ground, and there are two points where no paws touch the ground (when all limbs are fully extended, and again when all limbs are doubled up).
• The cheetah’s respiratory rate climbs from 60 to 150 breaths per minute when running at full speed.
• Cheetahs are the fastest land animals over short distances but must stop after about an hour because it gets too hot. They may take up to 20 minutes to cool down after a fast chase.
• Leopards have been recorded running as fast as 36 miles per hour (58 km/h) for short distances.
• African civets produce a musk from their perennial glands (located under the tail). Civet musk is usually a light yellow color, and has the consistency of thick grease. This musk is refined to produce a compound called civetone which is used in perfume, and some traditional medicines.
• African Civets are not the only species of civet to produce civet musk, the Lesser Indian Civet, or Rasse (Viverricula indica), also produces civet musk.
• Both male and female African Civets produce civet musk. The amount each animal can produce depends on the overall size of the animal. A large male African Civet can produce as much as 6.4 grams (.22 ounces) of civet musk every five days. The average African Civet produces 3-4 grams (.10-.14 ounces) every five days.
• 1 kilogram (2.2 pounds) of civet musk can produce 3000 litres (659.92 gallons) of good quality perfume making it very valuable.
• Civet musk and its refined form, civetone, were first identified in the 1920’s. The chemical compound was produced artificially beginning in the late 1940’s. High quality perfume producers are said to still prefer natural civetone, however, this may be changing as prices go up and concern for animal welfare increases.
• The African civet is the largest member of the Viverridae family, which contains a total of 66 species. All members of the Viverridae family are found in the Old World.
• A lion’s roar can be heard from five miles away.
• Mountain lions are known by more than 100 names, including panther, catamount, cougar, painter and puma. It’s scientific name is Felis concolor, which means “cat of one color.” At one time, mountain lions were very common!
• A mountain lion can jump 20 feet straight up.
• Siberian Tigers have much thicker fur than their warmer-climate relatives. A Siberian Tiger’s fur contains approximately 6,600 hairs per square inch (or 3,000 hairs per square cm).
• While there is little agreement about the exact number of subspecies of the Eurasian lynx, these five are commonly recognized: Lynx lynx lynx (found in Scandinavia, Central Europe, Eastern Europe and western Serbia, Caucasus, Siberia, Mongolia, Northern China, and Korea) Lynx lynx isabellinus (Central Asia) Lynx lynx kozlovi (Central Siberia) Lynx lynx sardiniae (Sardinia, now extinct) Lynx lynx stroganovi (Amur region).

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